What do........

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What do........

Post by Guest on Sat Jun 06, 2015 11:28 pm

blind people from birth dream about?

Do they dream?

Can they dream?

Surely they can't dream in images if they've never seen one?

And if they can hear,do they dream in sound?

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Re: What do........

Post by sassy on Sat Jun 06, 2015 11:36 pm

Interesting question. Found this which might answer it a bit:

A group of Danish researchers posed those questions in this month’s issue of Sleep Medicine. They recruited 50 adults: 11 blind from birth, 14 who became blind sometime after age 1, and 25 non-blind controls. Participants agreed that for a period of four weeks, whenever they had a dream they would fill out a computer questionnaire about it as soon as they woke up. (The blind volunteers used text-to-speech software.)

The questionnaire asked about several aspects of the dream: the sensory impressions (Did you see anything? If so, was it in color? Did you taste? Smell? Feel pain?); the emotional content (Were you angry? Sad? Afraid?); and the thematic content (Did you interact with someone? Did you fail at something? Was it realistic, or bizarre?). The questionnaire also asked whether the dream was a nightmare.

All of the non-blind control participants reported a visual impression in at least one dream. In contrast, none of the participants who had been totally blind since birth did. For the group with later-onset blindness, the longer they had lived without sight, the less they saw in their dreams.

Just as there are many ways to take in the world, there are many ways to dream about it. Blind people dream, just as they live, with a rich mix of sensory information.

About 18 percent of the blind participants (both congenital and later-onset) reported tasting in at least one dream, compared with 7 percent of controls. Nearly 30 percent of the blind reported smelling in at least one dream, compared with 15 percent of controls. Almost 70 percent of the blind reported a touch sensation, compared to 45 percent of controls. And 86 percent of the blind reported hearing, compared with 64 percent of controls.

(The differences are more drastic when looking only at the congenitally blind group. Among these participants, 26 percent tasted, 40 percent smelled, 67 percent touched and 93 percent heard in at least one dream.)

Despite these sensory differences, the emotional and thematic content of dreams isn’t much different in the blind and the sighted. Both groups reported about the same number of social interactions, successes, and failures in their dreams. They had the same distribution of emotions, and the same level of bizarreness.

There was, however, one notable difference between the dreams of the congenitally blind and controls. The blind had a lot more nightmares: around 25 percent, compared with just 7 percent of the later-onset blind group and 6 percent of controls. This difference held even after the researchers controlled for sleep quality, which is generally poorer among the blind.

So what could explain all of those nightmares? The researchers don’t know, but they speculated that it may have to do with evolutionary theories about why nightmares exist. “According to these theories, nightmares can be seen as threat simulations, as a mentally harmless way by which the human mind can adapt to the threats of life,” the researchers write. “The nightmare gives an individual an opportunity to rehearse the threat perception and the avoidance of coping with the threat.”

This seems to agree with what the congenitally blind participants reported in the study. Their nightmares included events such as getting lost, being hit by a car, falling into manholes, and losing their guide dog — all very real threats in their waking lives.

http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2014/02/26/how-the-blind-dream/

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Re: What do........

Post by Guest on Sat Jun 06, 2015 11:43 pm

It is an interesting question, of which I have just read the below article as its raised an interest to know. I cannot not imagine what that is like for blind people to visualize things they have never seen:




Paul Gabias has never seen a table. He was born prematurely and went blind shortly thereafter, most likely because of overexposure to oxygen in his incubator. And yet, Gabias, 60, has no trouble perceiving the table next to him. "My image of the table is exactly the same as a table," he said. "It has height, depth, width, texture; I can picture the whole thing all at once. It just has no color."

If you have trouble constructing a mental picture of a table that has no color — not even black or white — that's probably because you're blinded by your ability to see. Sighted people visualize the surrounding world by detecting borders between areas rich in different wavelengths of light, which we see as different colors. Gabias, like many blind people, builds pictures using his sense of touch, and by listening to the echoes of clicks of his tongue and taps of his cane as these sounds bounce off objects in his surroundings, a technique called echolocation.

"There's plenty of imagery that goes on all the time in blind people," he told Life's Little Mysteries. "It just isn't visual."

As well as being blind himself, Gabias is an associate professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia who conducts research on perceptual and cognitive aspects of blindness. His personal and professional experience leads him to believe that the brains of blind people work around the lack of visual information, and find other ways to achieve the same, vitally important result: a detailed 3D map of space.

The brain region neuroscientists normally think of as the "visual" cortex, rather than being left to languish, plays a key role in the blind's mental mapping process. [Do Colorblind People Dream In Color?]

In sighted people, visual information first goes to the visual cortex, which is located in the occipital lobe at the back of the brain. From there, it goes to the parietal lobe, sometimes referred to as the "where system" because it generates awareness of a sensed object's location. Next, the information is routed to the temporal lobe, also known as the "what system" because it identifies the object.

Evidence from recent brain-imaging experiments indicates that blind people's brains harness this same neural circuitry. "When blind people read Braille using touch, the sensory data is being sent to and processed in the visual cortex," said Morton Heller, a psychologist who studies spatial cognition and blindness at Eastern Illinois University. "Using touch, they get a sense of space" — and the relative locations of the raised dots that form Braille letters — "that's not visual, it's just spatial."

For blind people who are adept at echolocation, sound information routes through the visual cortex as well. Their brains use echoes to generate spatial maps, which are sometimes so detailed that they enable mountain biking, playing basketball and safely exploring new environments. In fact, last year, Canadian researchers discovered that even when blind echolocation experts listened to audio recordings of their tongue clicks echoing off different objects, they could easily identify the objects that had been present at the time of the recordings. Scans with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) showed activity in areas of their brains associated with visual processing. In other words, their brain scans resembled those of a sighted person identifying an object in a photo.

Clearly, detecting visual contrasts is only one method of many for perceiving reality. But when trying to imagine a world perceived using hearing or touch, one tends to automatically picture echoes and textures generating a visual image built out of contrasts between light and dark. Gabias cannot conceive of light and dark. So what, exactly, are his mental images like?

"I just picture tables. We have no idea what our brain is doing. We just perceive — that's the wonderful thing about it. This is all 'psychologization' that has made it complicated to explain, but simple to do. You don't know how you perceive. You just do it," he said.

"If you know that blind people know where to put their plates on their table, and you know that blind people deal with tables in the exactly the same way you do, then you presume that they imagine them in the same way you do. You have got to presume that what's inside their head is like yours."



http://www.livescience.com/23709-blind-people-picture-reality.html

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Re: What do........

Post by Guest on Sat Jun 06, 2015 11:44 pm

That's an interesting article thank you & it pretty much answers my question.

Nightmares are not much fun......whether one is blind or not.They are still bad news.

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Re: What do........

Post by sassy on Sat Jun 06, 2015 11:48 pm

Not much fun being an understatement. My Dad still has them from the last war.

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Re: What do........

Post by Guest on Sat Jun 06, 2015 11:53 pm

risingsun wrote:Not much fun being an understatement.   My Dad still has them from the last war.  

He has my sympathies & understanding.

Good night....And I'll let you know if I had a nightmare tonight.

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Re: What do........

Post by sassy on Sat Jun 06, 2015 11:57 pm

Goodnight Shady, hope you don't, Blessed Be




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