Religious Unaffiliation Is Growing In The U.S. Why Isn’t It In Congress?

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Religious Unaffiliation Is Growing In The U.S. Why Isn’t It In Congress? Empty Religious Unaffiliation Is Growing In The U.S. Why Isn’t It In Congress?

Post by phildidge on Wed Mar 13, 2019 10:12 pm

(RNS) — This fall, voters in the Midwest elected two Muslim women to the U.S. House of Representatives, the first female members of their faith to enter Congress. The same day, Arizona elected Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, who, while not the first of her kind, is even rarer: Sinema is the only person serving in Congress to identify as religiously unaffiliated — putting her in a caucus of less than 0.2 percent of the lawmaking body.

Even after adding in two representatives who identify as “Unitarian Universalist” and the eighteen who “Don’t know/refused,” just over 2.5 percent of those serving in Congress attest to an untraditional theistic faith or no faith at all.

Compare this to the general American public: fewer than half consider religion to be an important part of their lives. More pertinently, in a landmark 2015 Pew Research Center survey titled “America’s Changing Religious Landscape,” 22.8 percent of respondents identified as “religiously unaffiliated.” Of Democratic voters, the unaffiliated were the single largest “faith” group, at 28 percent. Unaffiliated Republican voters represented just 14 percent of respondents.

If an increasing number of people are not affiliating with a religious group and attendance at religious activities is believed to be in decline, why aren’t elected officials’ religious affiliations reflecting the trend?


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CONTINUE READING AT: RELIGION NEWS SERVICE

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Religious Unaffiliation Is Growing In The U.S. Why Isn’t It In Congress? Empty Re: Religious Unaffiliation Is Growing In The U.S. Why Isn’t It In Congress?

Post by Maddog on Thu Mar 14, 2019 6:15 am

phildidge wrote:(RNS) — This fall, voters in the Midwest elected two Muslim women to the U.S. House of Representatives, the first female members of their faith to enter Congress. The same day, Arizona elected Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, who, while not the first of her kind, is even rarer: Sinema is the only person serving in Congress to identify as religiously unaffiliated — putting her in a caucus of less than 0.2 percent of the lawmaking body.

Even after adding in two representatives who identify as “Unitarian Universalist” and the eighteen who “Don’t know/refused,” just over 2.5 percent of those serving in Congress attest to an untraditional theistic faith or no faith at all.

Compare this to the general American public: fewer than half consider religion to be an important part of their lives. More pertinently, in a landmark 2015 Pew Research Center survey titled “America’s Changing Religious Landscape,” 22.8 percent of respondents identified as “religiously unaffiliated.” Of Democratic voters, the unaffiliated were the single largest “faith” group, at 28 percent. Unaffiliated Republican voters represented just 14 percent of respondents.

If an increasing number of people are not affiliating with a religious group and attendance at religious activities is believed to be in decline, why aren’t elected officials’ religious affiliations reflecting the trend?


Continue reading by clicking the name of the source below.


CONTINUE READING AT: RELIGION NEWS SERVICE

The median age in the US is far below the median age in congress.

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Religious Unaffiliation Is Growing In The U.S. Why Isn’t It In Congress? Empty Re: Religious Unaffiliation Is Growing In The U.S. Why Isn’t It In Congress?

Post by phildidge on Thu Mar 14, 2019 6:17 am

[quote="Maddog"]
phildidge wrote:(RNS) — This fall, voters in the Midwest elected two Muslim women to the U.S. House of Representatives, the first female members of their faith to enter Congress. The same day, Arizona elected Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, who, while not the first of her kind, is even rarer: Sinema is the only person serving in Congress to identify as religiously unaffiliated — putting her in a caucus of less than 0.2 percent of the lawmaking body.

Even after adding in two representatives who identify as “Unitarian Universalist” and the eighteen who “Don’t know/refused,” just over 2.5 percent of those serving in Congress attest to an untraditional theistic faith or no faith at all.

Compare this to the general American public: fewer than half consider religion to be an important part of their lives. More pertinently, in a landmark 2015 Pew Research Center survey titled “America’s Changing Religious Landscape,” 22.8 percent of respondents identified as “religiously unaffiliated.” Of Democratic voters, the unaffiliated were the single largest “faith” group, at 28 percent. Unaffiliated Republican voters represented just 14 percent of respondents.

If an increasing number of people are not affiliating with a religious group and attendance at religious activities is believed to be in decline, why aren’t elected officials’ religious affiliations reflecting the trend?


Continue reading by clicking the name of the source below.


CONTINUE READING AT: RELIGION NEWS SERVICE

Annnnnnd?

Why ?

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Post by Maddog on Thu Mar 14, 2019 6:29 am

phildidge wrote:
Maddog wrote:

Annnnnnd?

Why ?
Why is the median age of congress higher than the rest of America?


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Post by phildidge on Thu Mar 14, 2019 6:35 am

Maddog wrote:
phildidge wrote:
Why is the median age of congress higher than the rest of America?


What has age have to do with anything here?

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Post by Maddog on Thu Mar 14, 2019 7:15 am

phildidge wrote:
Maddog wrote:

Why is the median age of congress higher than the rest of America?


What has age have to do with anything here?

In the United States, religious congregations have been graying for decades, and young adults are now much less religious than their elders. Recent surveys have found that younger adults are far less likely than older generations to identify with a religion, believe in God or engage in a variety of religious practices.

http://www.pewforum.org/2018/06/13/the-age-gap-in-religion-around-the-world/

The average age in the US is 38. In Congress it's 59.

Congress doesn't reflect the US. It reflects older people in the US who tend to be more religious.

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Post by veya_victaous on Thu Mar 14, 2019 3:39 pm

Maddog wrote:
phildidge wrote:
Maddog wrote:

Why is the median age of congress higher than the rest of America?


What has age have to do with anything here?

In the United States, religious congregations have been graying for decades, and young adults are now much less religious than their elders. Recent surveys have found that younger adults are far less likely than older generations to identify with a religion, believe in God or engage in a variety of religious practices.

http://www.pewforum.org/2018/06/13/the-age-gap-in-religion-around-the-world/

The average age in the US is 38. In Congress it's 59.

Congress doesn't reflect the US. It reflects older people in the US who tend to be more religious.  

I think that is an accurate assessment

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