Gove says EU laws prevent Britain from cracking down on puppy smuggling and pledges to tighten up rules after we quit the bloc

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Gove says EU laws prevent Britain from cracking down on puppy smuggling and pledges to tighten up rules after we quit the bloc

Post by HoratioTarr on Fri Nov 24, 2017 2:21 pm

Michael Gove today hit out at the EU for preventing Britain from cracking down on puppy smuggling and pledged to tighten rules once we quit the bloc.
The Environment Secretary pledged to lift animal welfare standards after Britain free itself from the red tape of Brussels.


The Cabinet minister said the public had misunderstood the parliamentary vote but pledged to enshrine animal sentience in British law after the outcry. 
Last week the charity Dogs Trust warned that thousands of puppies are being illegally smuggled into the UK in time for Christmas. 


In a written statement to Parliament he the UK's world-leading reputation on animal welfare can be raised further after we quit the bloc in March 2019.
He said: 'Once we have left the EU there is even more we could do. 
'EU rules prevent us from restricting or banning the live export of animals for slaughter. 
'EU rules also restrict us from cracking down on puppy smuggling or banning the import of puppies under six months.'
He said the vote in Parliament last week would not stop these practices 'but leaving the EU gives us the chance to do much better. We hope to say more in these areas next year'.


Mr Gove added: This government will continue to promote and enhance animal welfare, both now and after we have left the EU.'
The minister spoke out after a major row on social media which saw the public and animal rights campaigners lash out at the Government over the vote. 
A newspaper reported that MPs had voted that animal cannot feel pain or emotions - but politicians have insisted the vote was misunderstood and they did no such thing.
Mr Gove said: 'Voting against the amendment was not a vote against the idea that animals are sentient and feel pain - that is a misconception.'
He said the Government has already proven its credentials on animal rights by proposing to increase maximum sentences for animal cruelty from six months to five years and installing CCTV in slaughterhouses.
The RSPCA said it welcomed the reassurance that the government is committed to the very highest standards of animal welfare post-Brexit.
But it called for it to be written into the Brexit Bill that Britain acknowledges animals can feel pain and emotions. 


The Dogs Trust charity has warned that thousands of puppies are being smuggled into the UK for Christmas - including Chow Chows (pictured) which have been smuggled in to the UK




http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5111391/Gove-crack-puppy-smuggling-Brexit.html
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