'Exciting discovery' in common cold cure search

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'Exciting discovery' in common cold cure search

Post by Guest on Wed Aug 02, 2017 4:59 pm

Scientists believe they may have made a breakthrough in the search for a cure for the common cold.


Researchers say treatments could be developed based on antimicrobial peptides that occur naturally in the immune systems of humans and animals. The Edinburgh Napier University team observed how they increase the body's natural response to rhinovirus infection. Rhinovirus is the main virus responsible for the common cold. The team synthesised antimicrobial peptides found in pigs and sheep, and assessed their impact on lung cells infected with rhinovirus. The peptides successfully attacked the virus, and could provide clues for developing novel treatments based on peptides found in nature.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-40800941

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Re: 'Exciting discovery' in common cold cure search

Post by eddie on Wed Aug 02, 2017 7:51 pm

This is going to sound weird, but I've probably had about three colds in my entire life, only one of which was pretty bad. I've worked in schools, have my own snotty kids yet I don't seem to catch them.
Actually my son is pretty similar. We both seem to perhaps get a headache, then a cough for about a day then we're fine.

I'm the same with sickness bugs too. Rarely get them even after mopping up everyone else's vomit.

Having said all that, I've had two autoimmune diseases - Graves Disease (which I'll have for 'life') and glandular fever. Glandular fever seems rife in my family as both my brothers had it too.


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Re: 'Exciting discovery' in common cold cure search

Post by eddie on Wed Aug 02, 2017 7:52 pm

Hahaha sorry I realise you didn't ask for my medical history. I had a point somewhere. Forget what it was now. Rolling Eyes

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Re: 'Exciting discovery' in common cold cure search

Post by Raggamuffin on Wed Aug 02, 2017 7:54 pm

There's already a cure - your own immune system. What we want is a way to shorten colds and stop them dragging on really. Laughing

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Re: 'Exciting discovery' in common cold cure search

Post by HoratioTarr on Wed Aug 02, 2017 11:57 pm

Raggamuffin wrote:There's already a cure - your own immune system. What we want is a way to shorten colds and stop them dragging on really. Laughing

One of the problems is the body can't heal when it's using all its energy to digest and process junk food, sugar, etc.

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Re: 'Exciting discovery' in common cold cure search

Post by Original Quill on Thu Aug 03, 2017 3:28 am

Thorin wrote:Scientists believe they may have made a breakthrough in the search for a cure for the common cold.


Researchers say treatments could be developed based on antimicrobial peptides that occur naturally in the immune systems of humans and animals. The Edinburgh Napier University team observed how they increase the body's natural response to rhinovirus infection. Rhinovirus is the main virus responsible for the common cold. The team synthesised antimicrobial peptides found in pigs and sheep, and assessed their impact on lung cells infected with rhinovirus. The peptides successfully attacked the virus, and could provide clues for developing novel treatments based on peptides found in nature.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-40800941

Unfortunately, the virus is making improvements of its own. The immune resistant virus is developing a drug resistance of its own:

US National Library of Medicine wrote:Antiviral drug resistance is an increasing concern in immunocompromised patient populations, where ongoing viral replication and prolonged drug exposure lead to the selection of resistant strains. Rapid diagnosis of resistance can be made by associating characteristic viral mutations with resistance to various drugs as determined by phenotypic assays. Management of drug resistance includes optimization of host factors and drug delivery, selection of alternative therapies based on knowledge of mechanisms of resistance, and the development of new antivirals.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871161/

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Re: 'Exciting discovery' in common cold cure search

Post by Guest on Thu Aug 03, 2017 5:56 am

Original Quill wrote:
Thorin wrote:Scientists believe they may have made a breakthrough in the search for a cure for the common cold.


Researchers say treatments could be developed based on antimicrobial peptides that occur naturally in the immune systems of humans and animals. The Edinburgh Napier University team observed how they increase the body's natural response to rhinovirus infection. Rhinovirus is the main virus responsible for the common cold. The team synthesised antimicrobial peptides found in pigs and sheep, and assessed their impact on lung cells infected with rhinovirus. The peptides successfully attacked the virus, and could provide clues for developing novel treatments based on peptides found in nature.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-40800941

Unfortunately, the virus is making improvements of its own.  The immune resistant virus is developing a drug resistance of its own:

US National Library of Medicine wrote:Antiviral drug resistance is an increasing concern in immunocompromised patient populations, where ongoing viral replication and prolonged drug exposure lead to the selection of resistant strains. Rapid diagnosis of resistance can be made by associating characteristic viral mutations with resistance to various drugs as determined by phenotypic assays. Management of drug resistance includes optimization of host factors and drug delivery, selection of alternative therapies based on knowledge of mechanisms of resistance, and the development of new antivirals.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2871161/


Your article is about those who have an immune deficiency. Like those with aids, who are having chemotherapy, have had their spleen removed etc.

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Re: 'Exciting discovery' in common cold cure search

Post by eddie on Thu Aug 03, 2017 2:09 pm

HoratioTarr wrote:
Raggamuffin wrote:There's already a cure - your own immune system. What we want is a way to shorten colds and stop them dragging on really. Laughing

One of the problems is the body can't heal when it's using all its energy to digest and process junk food, sugar, etc.

Don't know why someone gave you a red for that when everyone knows sugar etc is bad for you.

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Re: 'Exciting discovery' in common cold cure search

Post by Original Quill on Thu Aug 03, 2017 4:50 pm

Thorin wrote:
Original Quill wrote:

Unfortunately, the virus is making improvements of its own.  The immune resistant virus is developing a drug resistance of its own:



Your article is about those who have an immune deficiency. Like those with aids, who are having chemotherapy, have had their spleen removed etc.

Sorry, wrong article.

Mayo Clinic wrote:Antibiotics: Misuse puts you and others at risk

Antibiotics can be lifesavers, but misuse has increased the number of drug-resistant germs. See how this affects you and what you can do to help prevent antibiotic resistance.

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Antibiotics are important drugs. It would be difficult to overstate the benefit penicillin and other antibiotics have played in treating bacterial infections, preventing the spread of disease and minimizing serious complications of disease.

But there is also a problem with antibiotic medications. Drugs that used to be standard treatments for bacterial infections are now less effective or don't work at all. When an antibiotic drug no longer has an effect on a certain strain of bacteria, those bacteria are said to be antibiotic resistant.

The overuse and misuse of antibiotics are key factors contributing to antibiotic resistance. The general public, doctors and hospitals all play a role in ensuring proper use of the drugs and minimizing the development of antibiotic resistance.

What causes antibiotic resistance?

A bacterium is resistant to a drug when it has changed in some way that either protects it from the action of the drug or neutralizes the drug. Any bacterium that survives an antibiotic treatment can then multiply and pass on its resistant properties. Also, some bacteria can transfer their drug-resistant properties to other bacteria — as if passing along a cheat sheet to help each other survive.

The fact that bacteria develop resistance to a drug is normal and expected. However, the way that drugs are used affects how quickly and to what extent drug resistance occurs.

Overuse of antibiotics

The overuse of antibiotics — especially taking antibiotics even when they're not the appropriate treatment — promotes antibiotic resistance. Antibiotics treat bacterial infections but not viral infections. For example, an antibiotic is an appropriate treatment for strep throat, which is caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes. It's not, however, the right treatment for most sore throats, which are caused by viruses.

If you take an antibiotic when you actually have a viral infection, the antibiotic is still attacking bacteria in your body — bacteria that are either beneficial or at least not causing disease. This misdirected treatment can then promote antibiotic-resistant properties in harmless bacteria that can be shared with other bacteria.

Common viral infections that do not benefit from antibiotic treatment include:

*Cold
*Flu (influenza)
*Bronchitis
*Most coughs
*Most sore throats
*Some ear infections
*Some sinus infections
*Stomach flu (viral gastroenteritis)

There are likely several factors contributing to overuse. When penicillin and other antibiotics were first introduced, they were perceived as wonder drugs because they worked quickly and with relatively few side effects. They seemed like an answer to all common illnesses.

In spite of a growing awareness of antibiotic resistance in recent years, overuse still occurs for a number of reasons:

*Doctors may prescribe antibiotics before receiving test results that identify the actual cause of infection.
*People who want quick relief from symptoms, regardless of the cause of illness, may pressure doctors for antibiotic prescriptions.
*People may take antibiotics purchased abroad or via the Internet for self-diagnosed illnesses.
*People may take antibiotics that are leftovers from a previous prescription.

Problems with not following instructions

Failure to take an antibiotic as prescribed can contribute to antibiotic resistance. The instructions for an antibiotic tell you how many pills to take and how often you should take them. The prescription is filled so that you have the exact number of drugs you need to complete the course of treatment.

It is tempting to stop taking an antibiotic as soon as you feel better. But the full treatment is necessary to kill the disease-causing bacteria. Failure to do so can result in the need to resume treatment later and may promote the spread of antibiotic-resistant properties among harmful bacteria.

Consequences of antibiotic resistance

For many years, the introduction of new antibiotics outpaced the development of antibiotic resistance. In recent years, however, the pace of drug resistance has contributed to an increasing number of health care problems.

In the United States, according to a 2013 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at least 2 million people annually "acquire serious infections with bacteria that are resistant to one or more of the antibiotics designed to treat those infections." And at least 23,000 people die annually from antibiotic-resistant infections.

The increasing number of drug-resistant infections results in:

*More-serious illness or disability
*More deaths from previously treatable illnesses
*Prolonged recovery
*More-frequent or longer hospitalization
*More doctor visits
*Less effective or more-invasive treatments
*More-expensive treatments

Antibiotic stewardship

The appropriate use of antibiotics — often called antibiotic stewardship — can help preserve the effectiveness of current antibiotics, extend their life span and protect the public from antibiotic-resistant infections. Many hospitals and medical associations have implemented new diagnostic and treatment guidelines to ensure effective treatments for bacterial infections and reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics.

The public also plays a role in antibiotic stewardship. You can help reduce the development of antibiotic resistance by taking the following steps:

*Use antibiotics only as prescribed by your doctor.
*Take the appropriate daily dosage and complete the entire course of treatment.
*If you have an antibiotic prescription, ask your doctor what you should do if you forget to take a dose.
*If for some reason you have leftover antibiotics, throw them away. Never take leftover antibiotics for a later illness. They may not be the correct antibiotic and would not be a full course of treatment.
*Never take antibiotics prescribed for another person.
*Don't pressure your doctor to give you an antibiotic prescription. Ask your doctor for advice on how to treat symptoms.
*Practice good hygiene. Wash your hands regularly with soap and water, especially after using the toilet, before eating, before preparing food and after handling fresh meat. Wash fruits and vegetables thoroughly, and keep kitchen work surfaces clean.
*Make sure you or your children receive recommended vaccinations. Some recommended vaccines protect against bacterial infections, such as diphtheria and whooping cough (pertussis).
*If you think you may have penicillin allergy, talk to your doctor about getting an allergy skin test. Research has shown that penicillin or other antibiotic allergies may be overreported. Ruling out an antibiotic allergy can help your doctor prescribe the most appropriate antibiotic when it's needed.

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Re: 'Exciting discovery' in common cold cure search

Post by Raggamuffin on Thu Aug 03, 2017 5:20 pm

That article is about antibiotics, which are useless for viral infections anyway. Interestingly though, I read an article the other day which contradicts the usual advice to keep taking your antibiotics even if you feel better.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/jul/26/rule-patients-must-finish-antibiotics-course-wrong-study-says

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Re: 'Exciting discovery' in common cold cure search

Post by Guest on Thu Aug 03, 2017 5:24 pm

Antibiotics do not work against viruses full stop Quill.
Antibiotics are used for infections caused by bacteria.
Think you have got yourself muddled up here, as this is the common cold mate

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Re: 'Exciting discovery' in common cold cure search

Post by Original Quill on Thu Aug 03, 2017 6:59 pm

Thorin wrote:Antibiotics do not work against viruses full stop Quill.
Antibiotics are used for infections caused by bacteria.
Think you have got yourself muddled up here, as this is the common cold mate

This is true. But the excuse that doctors constantly give is, if we knock out associated illnesses the body will be stronger to fight off a virus. Consequently, bacterial infections are gaining resistance.

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Re: 'Exciting discovery' in common cold cure search

Post by HoratioTarr on Thu Aug 03, 2017 10:40 pm

eddie wrote:
HoratioTarr wrote:

One of the problems is the body can't heal when it's using all its energy to digest and process junk food, sugar, etc.

Don't know why someone gave you a red for that when everyone knows sugar etc is bad for you.

Any idiot knows that a poor diet is one of the contributing factors to a poor immune system. When we consume too much sugar, we encourage the proliferation of Candida albicans. Candida usually coexists with other good bacteria in your gut but too much sugar will feed Candida and it'll start to dominate your gut.

At this point it affects your digestion, weakens the immune system, and can damage your intestinal wall, allowing its toxic metabolic byproducts to escape into your bloodstream and spread throughout your body. This is called leaky gut.

Toxic byproducts of Candida wreak havoc on your health and wellbeing. The major waste product of yeast cell activity is acetaldehyde, a poisonous neurotoxin that promotes free radical activity in the body. It's what helps give you a hangover.

I know all this because I've had it. Crashing fatigue. Headaches. Feeling hung over. Constant colds. Bloating. Aching joints. Chest infections. I was at my wits' end. Then I gave up sugar and all yeast related food for four months, got the Candida under control, and I'm fine now.

There is a some controversy over leaky gut, but the Candida diet worked for me. I think our diets these days are way too heavily influenced by processed foods and sugary additives.

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Re: 'Exciting discovery' in common cold cure search

Post by Guest on Thu Aug 03, 2017 11:32 pm

Original Quill wrote:
Thorin wrote:Antibiotics do not work against viruses full stop Quill.
Antibiotics are used for infections caused by bacteria.
Think you have got yourself muddled up here, as this is the common cold mate

This is true.  But the excuse that doctors constantly give is, if we knock out associated illnesses the body will be stronger to fight off a virus.  Consequently, bacterial infections are gaining resistance.


But this not about bacterial infections Quill, of which is a separate subject and one I agree on you with.

If they can help tackle colds, its going to help many with breathing conditions, which can be life threatening for some.

Luckily I never seem to get colds much.

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Re: 'Exciting discovery' in common cold cure search

Post by Original Quill on Fri Aug 04, 2017 3:50 am

You are right. I was thinking of antiviral immunity. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3971377/

Same here...the last virus I caught, I got from an anti-flu shot. I just stay away from the shots, and never get the virus.

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