Question regarding American History

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Question regarding American History

Post by HoratioTarr on Wed Jun 21, 2017 1:36 pm

An odd one I know, but I can't seem to find the answer on line.

Did people wear gum boots/wellington boots at around 1897?
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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by WhoseYourWolfie on Wed Jun 21, 2017 1:57 pm

. Smile

Here's one reference for "Wellington boots"  :

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wellington_boot#History

Gumboots: the dairy farmer's best friend..

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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by Original Quill on Wed Jun 21, 2017 10:50 pm

This is what I grew up with on the East Coast:



When there wasn't snow or heavy rain, it was either cowboy boots of motorcycle (engineering) boots:



The rubber boots are for working on the salmon fleet.



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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by eddie on Wed Jun 21, 2017 11:28 pm

I am curious to know why Horatio asked the question.

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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by HoratioTarr on Thu Jun 22, 2017 12:56 am

Thanks everyone..but I wanted to know about the specific era. I know rubber boots were around pretty early on but wondered about footwear for that region. I think I need to facebook it and find a site that might tell me.
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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by HoratioTarr on Thu Jun 22, 2017 12:56 am

eddie wrote:I am curious to know why Horatio asked the question.

Research.
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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by HoratioTarr on Thu Jun 22, 2017 1:03 am

I just found my answer on a Civil war history site. Gum shoes or boots were around in 1850. They called them rubbers.
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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by Syl on Thu Jun 22, 2017 1:04 am

HoratioTarr wrote:Thanks everyone..but I wanted to know about the specific era.  I know rubber boots were around pretty early on but wondered about footwear for that region.  I think I need to facebook it and find a site that might tell me.  

Have you looked on Pinterest.?

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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by Syl on Thu Jun 22, 2017 1:05 am

HoratioTarr wrote:I just found my answer on a Civil war history site.   Gum shoes or boots were around in 1850.  They called them rubbers.

Odd how words change meanings. Laughing

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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by Guest on Thu Jun 22, 2017 1:07 am

Hope this helps Horatio



The Stuart cavaliers--king's men all--that immigrated to America during the Cromwellian Interregnum brought with them their thigh high riding boots...with high heels. Many settled in the south and indeed the bulk of the southern plantation class was descended from cavalier stock; a fact that played a big part in the unfolding of the American Civil War and the pre-eminence of the southern cavalry. Before and after the civil war many southerners emigrated to Texas or went west to escape the devastation of the war. Again their notion of high heels and nobility went with them.

And as the new century began, boots became very fashionable, even for women. In 1815, Arthur Wellsley, First Duke of Wellington, defeated Napoleon at Waterloo. In the wake of his victory and his ensuing popularity, Wellington boots became THE style. The major difference in these boots from previous styles was that the heels were low cut and the tops were only calf high. At Northampton there is a pair of dress wellingtons made in 1817. They are a four piece boot--vamp, counter cover, front and back tops--with beaded side seams (the same layout as a modern cowboy boot).

The vamps and counter covers are black patent leather, the tops are maroon with an olive top binding and trim...and they have a fancy decorative stitch pattern on the front of the leg. With 1" stacked leather heels and inside canvas pulls they are remarkably like the western boots that later became part of the history of the American frontier. In 1847, S.C. Shive, in America, patented the patterns and crimping board for what we call a Full Wellington--a two piece boot that found wide acceptance among the military, horsemen, and adventurers of the time. By 1868 Wellingtons were almost exclusively an American style, not much seen in a Europe which preferred the Hessian boot.

From the 1850's to the 1880's, the full wellington was the boot that military officers were issued. And although by regulation, foot soldiers and enlisted men were issued shoes (ankle high lace-ups--predecessors of the packer), the full wellington was preferred and was the boot that went west with the army and the nation.(see photos) During the Civil War, the Quartermaster Corp. requisitioned supplies from many different civilian contractors. The word shoddy derives from this time and refers to a particular kind of wool cloth made from mill sweepings. This cloth was made into blankets and coats and often fell apart as soon as it got wet. In the same vein, military boot orders were often filled by unscrupulous contractors, as well. This is significant in light of the fact that at the end of the war the federal government had a half million pairs of surplus boots on hand--boots which needed to be disposed of. In the years that followed, troops stationed on the frontier often found that the boots that they were issued fell apart quickly, especially in the severe climate and terrain. Just naturally they turned to nearby civilian makers to replace the defective footwear. This business was to be the foundation of the cowboy boot trade that flourished in the ensuing years. It must be said that during and after the war, the Quartermaster Corp. was deeply involved in testing various designs...from leg heights, to methods of attaching soles, to different types and origins of leather. Many advances in construction and materials were introduced by the military. The leather that was settled upon for construction of the uppers is especially noteworthy. After much experimentation, an oak-tanned Spanish leather which was heavily waxed on the flesh side became the standard. And it was from this waxed calf that most of the early cowboy boots were constructed, as well.

By 1870 the standard boot worn by frontier horsemen was, essentially, a variation of military issue. The Coffeyville pattern, as it was called, had a higher Cuban heel (scooped instead of straight in profile); and the front of the boot, despite being basically a full wellington, was often grafted. Indeed, this grafting or piecing of the front of the boot is almost the distinguishing characteristic of many non-military boots. This is not too surprising given that all boots, whether made for military issue or as bespoke (custom) footwear, were made by civilian makers during this time.

By the 1880's the cowboy boot, as a separate style, was beginning to emerge. Now we begin to see stovepipe tops, star and horseshoe inlays, stitch patterns and high heels. By 1900 the four piece boot had become the dominant form--probably as a response to the difficulty of construction with a full wellington, an emerging standard of fit that was somewhat more precise than heretofore, and the fact that, historically, the four piece wellington had been reserved for wealthier customers. Styles, of course, did change with the times. Many are the variations of color and decoration. Heights of heel and top have come and gone; and subtle regional variations have also emerged, so that today, for an experienced eye, there is a marked difference in the Texas boot and the northern boot and perhaps, even the Great Basin boot. For those familiar with western boots, there are presently four major variations of the historical cowboy boot. There is the four piece--the dress wellington--which, as we have seen, evolved from the full wellington in the 1800's. Of course, there is the full wellington itself, which is still around and being made by a few custom makers, both in historical and contemporary configurations.

In 1887, the military began to issue a different style of boot. Like an English riding boot, they had a seam running up the back of the boot rather than up the side as in the traditional wellington. And in fact, by 1889, the officers boot looked almost identical to the English style. This pattern remained standard issue until the army abandoned the horse and horse units shortly after the 1st World War.

During the late 1800's, many prize work competitions were staged to demonstrate that factory workers could not compete with skilled craftsmen. Some of the fanciest and most refined work ever to be done was created for these exhibitions. Ms. Swann tells of coming across boots made in Philadelphia for show that were stitched 64 stitches to the inch. Now just about the finest work that can be done on leather with a modern sewing machine is approximately 30 stitches to the inch. More stitches only tear the leather. Additionally, we know that this work was done by hand. James Devlin says in his book The Guide To The Trade that this work was done with an awl so fine that upon an accidental piercing of his hand, the wound neither hurt nor bled; and that a human hair was used for a needle. And although those working in the trade--the boot and shoemakers--are fewer each year; those who work the bristle and the awl do so under the scrutiny of the ghosts of past masters.

https://people.seas.harvard.edu/~jones/mckay/history.html


Night

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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by Original Quill on Thu Jun 22, 2017 6:28 am

There were rubbers when I was a kid:



They were just rubber covers for shoes.  You slipped them on over your dress shoes, hooking them on the toe, and using the index finger to stretch them on. They kept the dress shoes from getting wet or muddy.

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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by WhoseYourWolfie on Thu Jun 22, 2017 11:34 am

Original Quill wrote:There were rubbers when I was a kid:



They were just rubber covers for shoes.  You slipped them on over your dress shoes, hooking them on the toe, and using the index finger to stretch them on.  They kept the dress shoes from getting wet or muddy.

Arrow

Those were called "overshoes" and "overboots" down here...

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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by HoratioTarr on Thu Jun 22, 2017 11:48 am

Syl wrote:
HoratioTarr wrote:I just found my answer on a Civil war history site.   Gum shoes or boots were around in 1850.  They called them rubbers.

Odd how words change meanings. Laughing

You and your dirty mind..... tongue
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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by HoratioTarr on Thu Jun 22, 2017 11:52 am

Thorin wrote:Hope this helps Horatio



The Stuart cavaliers--king's men all--that immigrated to America during the Cromwellian Interregnum brought with them their thigh high riding boots...with high heels. Many settled in the south and indeed the bulk of the southern plantation class was descended from cavalier stock; a fact that played a big part in the unfolding of the American Civil War and the pre-eminence of the southern cavalry. Before and after the civil war many southerners emigrated to Texas or went west to escape the devastation of the war. Again their notion of high heels and nobility went with them.

And as the new century began, boots became very fashionable, even for women. In 1815, Arthur Wellsley, First Duke of Wellington, defeated Napoleon at Waterloo. In the wake of his victory and his ensuing popularity, Wellington boots became THE style. The major difference in these boots from previous styles was that the heels were low cut and the tops were only calf high. At Northampton there is a pair of dress wellingtons made in 1817. They are a four piece boot--vamp, counter cover, front and back tops--with beaded side seams (the same layout as a modern cowboy boot).

The vamps and counter covers are black patent leather, the tops are maroon with an olive top binding and trim...and they have a fancy decorative stitch pattern on the front of the leg. With 1" stacked leather heels and inside canvas pulls they are remarkably like the western boots that later became part of the history of the American frontier. In 1847, S.C. Shive, in America, patented the patterns and crimping board for what we call a Full Wellington--a two piece boot that found wide acceptance among the military, horsemen, and adventurers of the time. By 1868 Wellingtons were almost exclusively an American style, not much seen in a Europe which preferred the Hessian boot.

From the 1850's to the 1880's, the full wellington was the boot that military officers were issued. And although by regulation, foot soldiers and enlisted men were issued shoes (ankle high lace-ups--predecessors of the packer), the full wellington was preferred and was the boot that went west with the army and the nation.(see photos) During the Civil War, the Quartermaster Corp. requisitioned supplies from many different civilian contractors. The word shoddy derives from this time and refers to a particular kind of wool cloth made from mill sweepings. This cloth was made into blankets and coats and often fell apart as soon as it got wet. In the same vein, military boot orders were often filled by unscrupulous contractors, as well. This is significant in light of the fact that at the end of the war the federal government had a half million pairs of surplus boots on hand--boots which needed to be disposed of. In the years that followed, troops stationed on the frontier often found that the boots that they were issued fell apart quickly, especially in the severe climate and terrain. Just naturally they turned to nearby civilian makers to replace the defective footwear. This business was to be the foundation of the cowboy boot trade that flourished in the ensuing years. It must be said that during and after the war, the Quartermaster Corp. was deeply involved in testing various designs...from leg heights, to methods of attaching soles, to different types and origins of leather. Many advances in construction and materials were introduced by the military. The leather that was settled upon for construction of the uppers is especially noteworthy. After much experimentation, an oak-tanned Spanish leather which was heavily waxed on the flesh side became the standard. And it was from this waxed calf that most of the early cowboy boots were constructed, as well.

By 1870 the standard boot worn by frontier horsemen was, essentially, a variation of military issue. The Coffeyville pattern, as it was called, had a higher Cuban heel (scooped instead of straight in profile); and the front of the boot, despite being basically a full wellington, was often grafted. Indeed, this grafting or piecing of the front of the boot is almost the distinguishing characteristic of many non-military boots. This is not too surprising given that all boots, whether made for military issue or as bespoke (custom) footwear, were made by civilian makers during this time.

By the 1880's the cowboy boot, as a separate style, was beginning to emerge. Now we begin to see stovepipe tops, star and horseshoe inlays, stitch patterns and high heels. By 1900 the four piece boot had become the dominant form--probably as a response to the difficulty of construction with a full wellington, an emerging standard of fit that was somewhat more precise than heretofore, and the fact that, historically, the four piece wellington had been reserved for wealthier customers. Styles, of course, did change with the times. Many are the variations of color and decoration. Heights of heel and top have come and gone; and subtle regional variations have also emerged, so that today, for an experienced eye, there is a marked difference in the Texas boot and the northern boot and perhaps, even the Great Basin boot. For those familiar with western boots, there are presently four major variations of the historical cowboy boot. There is the four piece--the dress wellington--which, as we have seen, evolved from the full wellington in the 1800's. Of course, there is the full wellington itself, which is still around and being made by a few custom makers, both in historical and contemporary configurations.

In 1887, the military began to issue a different style of boot. Like an English riding boot, they had a seam running up the back of the boot rather than up the side as in the traditional wellington. And in fact, by 1889, the officers boot looked almost identical to the English style. This pattern remained standard issue until the army abandoned the horse and horse units shortly after the 1st World War.

During the late 1800's, many prize work competitions were staged to demonstrate that factory workers could not compete with skilled craftsmen. Some of the fanciest and most refined work ever to be done was created for these exhibitions. Ms. Swann tells of coming across boots made in Philadelphia for show that were stitched 64 stitches to the inch. Now just about the finest work that can be done on leather with a modern sewing machine is approximately 30 stitches to the inch. More stitches only tear the leather. Additionally, we know that this work was done by hand. James Devlin says in his book The Guide To The Trade that this work was done with an awl so fine that upon an accidental piercing of his hand, the wound neither hurt nor bled; and that a human hair was used for a needle. And although those working in the trade--the boot and shoemakers--are fewer each year; those who work the bristle and the awl do so under the scrutiny of the ghosts of past masters.

https://people.seas.harvard.edu/~jones/mckay/history.html


Night

Thank you for that. I think rubber boots as we know them weren't around. What the hell did they wear in the snow because that's what I need to know. The period is 1897 to 1900 and the region is Mingo County West Virginia.
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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by Guest on Thu Jun 22, 2017 12:46 pm

That I have no idea on Horatio. Clearly this is a topic of history I have not read about or researched, but just from some researching myself. Its clear to me this is an area of history that little is written about. Shows that some much of history that we no not know about.

Maybe there is some history Museums you could email in West Virginia for some answers??

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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by Original Quill on Thu Jun 22, 2017 6:13 pm

Thorin wrote:Hope this helps Horatio

The Stuart cavaliers--king's men all--that immigrated to America during the Cromwellian Interregnum brought with them their thigh high riding boots...with high heels. Many settled in the south and indeed the bulk of the southern plantation class was descended from cavalier stock; a fact that played a big part in the unfolding of the American Civil War and the pre-eminence of the southern cavalry. Before and after the civil war many southerners emigrated to Texas or went west to escape the devastation of the war. Again their notion of high heels and nobility went with them.

And as the new century began, boots became very fashionable, even for women. In 1815, Arthur Wellsley, First Duke of Wellington, defeated Napoleon at Waterloo. In the wake of his victory and his ensuing popularity, Wellington boots became THE style. The major difference in these boots from previous styles was that the heels were low cut and the tops were only calf high. At Northampton there is a pair of dress wellingtons made in 1817. They are a four piece boot--vamp, counter cover, front and back tops--with beaded side seams (the same layout as a modern cowboy boot).

The vamps and counter covers are black patent leather, the tops are maroon with an olive top binding and trim...and they have a fancy decorative stitch pattern on the front of the leg. With 1" stacked leather heels and inside canvas pulls they are remarkably like the western boots that later became part of the history of the American frontier. In 1847, S.C. Shive, in America, patented the patterns and crimping board for what we call a Full Wellington--a two piece boot that found wide acceptance among the military, horsemen, and adventurers of the time. By 1868 Wellingtons were almost exclusively an American style, not much seen in a Europe which preferred the Hessian boot.

From the 1850's to the 1880's, the full wellington was the boot that military officers were issued. And although by regulation, foot soldiers and enlisted men were issued shoes (ankle high lace-ups--predecessors of the packer), the full wellington was preferred and was the boot that went west with the army and the nation.(see photos) During the Civil War, the Quartermaster Corp. requisitioned supplies from many different civilian contractors. The word shoddy derives from this time and refers to a particular kind of wool cloth made from mill sweepings. This cloth was made into blankets and coats and often fell apart as soon as it got wet. In the same vein, military boot orders were often filled by unscrupulous contractors, as well. This is significant in light of the fact that at the end of the war the federal government had a half million pairs of surplus boots on hand--boots which needed to be disposed of. In the years that followed, troops stationed on the frontier often found that the boots that they were issued fell apart quickly, especially in the severe climate and terrain. Just naturally they turned to nearby civilian makers to replace the defective footwear. This business was to be the foundation of the cowboy boot trade that flourished in the ensuing years. It must be said that during and after the war, the Quartermaster Corp. was deeply involved in testing various designs...from leg heights, to methods of attaching soles, to different types and origins of leather. Many advances in construction and materials were introduced by the military. The leather that was settled upon for construction of the uppers is especially noteworthy. After much experimentation, an oak-tanned Spanish leather which was heavily waxed on the flesh side became the standard. And it was from this waxed calf that most of the early cowboy boots were constructed, as well.

By 1870 the standard boot worn by frontier horsemen was, essentially, a variation of military issue. The Coffeyville pattern, as it was called, had a higher Cuban heel (scooped instead of straight in profile); and the front of the boot, despite being basically a full wellington, was often grafted. Indeed, this grafting or piecing of the front of the boot is almost the distinguishing characteristic of many non-military boots. This is not too surprising given that all boots, whether made for military issue or as bespoke (custom) footwear, were made by civilian makers during this time.

By the 1880's the cowboy boot, as a separate style, was beginning to emerge. Now we begin to see stovepipe tops, star and horseshoe inlays, stitch patterns and high heels. By 1900 the four piece boot had become the dominant form--probably as a response to the difficulty of construction with a full wellington, an emerging standard of fit that was somewhat more precise than heretofore, and the fact that, historically, the four piece wellington had been reserved for wealthier customers. Styles, of course, did change with the times. Many are the variations of color and decoration. Heights of heel and top have come and gone; and subtle regional variations have also emerged, so that today, for an experienced eye, there is a marked difference in the Texas boot and the northern boot and perhaps, even the Great Basin boot. For those familiar with western boots, there are presently four major variations of the historical cowboy boot. There is the four piece--the dress wellington--which, as we have seen, evolved from the full wellington in the 1800's. Of course, there is the full wellington itself, which is still around and being made by a few custom makers, both in historical and contemporary configurations.

In 1887, the military began to issue a different style of boot. Like an English riding boot, they had a seam running up the back of the boot rather than up the side as in the traditional wellington. And in fact, by 1889, the officers boot looked almost identical to the English style. This pattern remained standard issue until the army abandoned the horse and horse units shortly after the 1st World War.

During the late 1800's, many prize work competitions were staged to demonstrate that factory workers could not compete with skilled craftsmen. Some of the fanciest and most refined work ever to be done was created for these exhibitions. Ms. Swann tells of coming across boots made in Philadelphia for show that were stitched 64 stitches to the inch. Now just about the finest work that can be done on leather with a modern sewing machine is approximately 30 stitches to the inch. More stitches only tear the leather. Additionally, we know that this work was done by hand. James Devlin says in his book The Guide To The Trade that this work was done with an awl so fine that upon an accidental piercing of his hand, the wound neither hurt nor bled; and that a human hair was used for a needle. And although those working in the trade--the boot and shoemakers--are fewer each year; those who work the bristle and the awl do so under the scrutiny of the ghosts of past masters.

https://people.seas.harvard.edu/~jones/mckay/history.html

Night

Fascinating stuff. Great post, didge....and true in historical detail.

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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by Guest on Thu Jun 22, 2017 6:18 pm

Original Quill wrote:
Thorin wrote:Hope this helps Horatio

The Stuart cavaliers--king's men all--that immigrated to America during the Cromwellian Interregnum brought with them their thigh high riding boots...with high heels. Many settled in the south and indeed the bulk of the southern plantation class was descended from cavalier stock; a fact that played a big part in the unfolding of the American Civil War and the pre-eminence of the southern cavalry. Before and after the civil war many southerners emigrated to Texas or went west to escape the devastation of the war. Again their notion of high heels and nobility went with them.

And as the new century began, boots became very fashionable, even for women. In 1815, Arthur Wellsley, First Duke of Wellington, defeated Napoleon at Waterloo. In the wake of his victory and his ensuing popularity, Wellington boots became THE style. The major difference in these boots from previous styles was that the heels were low cut and the tops were only calf high. At Northampton there is a pair of dress wellingtons made in 1817. They are a four piece boot--vamp, counter cover, front and back tops--with beaded side seams (the same layout as a modern cowboy boot).

The vamps and counter covers are black patent leather, the tops are maroon with an olive top binding and trim...and they have a fancy decorative stitch pattern on the front of the leg. With 1" stacked leather heels and inside canvas pulls they are remarkably like the western boots that later became part of the history of the American frontier. In 1847, S.C. Shive, in America, patented the patterns and crimping board for what we call a Full Wellington--a two piece boot that found wide acceptance among the military, horsemen, and adventurers of the time. By 1868 Wellingtons were almost exclusively an American style, not much seen in a Europe which preferred the Hessian boot.

From the 1850's to the 1880's, the full wellington was the boot that military officers were issued. And although by regulation, foot soldiers and enlisted men were issued shoes (ankle high lace-ups--predecessors of the packer), the full wellington was preferred and was the boot that went west with the army and the nation.(see photos) During the Civil War, the Quartermaster Corp. requisitioned supplies from many different civilian contractors. The word shoddy derives from this time and refers to a particular kind of wool cloth made from mill sweepings. This cloth was made into blankets and coats and often fell apart as soon as it got wet. In the same vein, military boot orders were often filled by unscrupulous contractors, as well. This is significant in light of the fact that at the end of the war the federal government had a half million pairs of surplus boots on hand--boots which needed to be disposed of. In the years that followed, troops stationed on the frontier often found that the boots that they were issued fell apart quickly, especially in the severe climate and terrain. Just naturally they turned to nearby civilian makers to replace the defective footwear. This business was to be the foundation of the cowboy boot trade that flourished in the ensuing years. It must be said that during and after the war, the Quartermaster Corp. was deeply involved in testing various designs...from leg heights, to methods of attaching soles, to different types and origins of leather. Many advances in construction and materials were introduced by the military. The leather that was settled upon for construction of the uppers is especially noteworthy. After much experimentation, an oak-tanned Spanish leather which was heavily waxed on the flesh side became the standard. And it was from this waxed calf that most of the early cowboy boots were constructed, as well.

By 1870 the standard boot worn by frontier horsemen was, essentially, a variation of military issue. The Coffeyville pattern, as it was called, had a higher Cuban heel (scooped instead of straight in profile); and the front of the boot, despite being basically a full wellington, was often grafted. Indeed, this grafting or piecing of the front of the boot is almost the distinguishing characteristic of many non-military boots. This is not too surprising given that all boots, whether made for military issue or as bespoke (custom) footwear, were made by civilian makers during this time.

By the 1880's the cowboy boot, as a separate style, was beginning to emerge. Now we begin to see stovepipe tops, star and horseshoe inlays, stitch patterns and high heels. By 1900 the four piece boot had become the dominant form--probably as a response to the difficulty of construction with a full wellington, an emerging standard of fit that was somewhat more precise than heretofore, and the fact that, historically, the four piece wellington had been reserved for wealthier customers. Styles, of course, did change with the times. Many are the variations of color and decoration. Heights of heel and top have come and gone; and subtle regional variations have also emerged, so that today, for an experienced eye, there is a marked difference in the Texas boot and the northern boot and perhaps, even the Great Basin boot. For those familiar with western boots, there are presently four major variations of the historical cowboy boot. There is the four piece--the dress wellington--which, as we have seen, evolved from the full wellington in the 1800's. Of course, there is the full wellington itself, which is still around and being made by a few custom makers, both in historical and contemporary configurations.

In 1887, the military began to issue a different style of boot. Like an English riding boot, they had a seam running up the back of the boot rather than up the side as in the traditional wellington. And in fact, by 1889, the officers boot looked almost identical to the English style. This pattern remained standard issue until the army abandoned the horse and horse units shortly after the 1st World War.

During the late 1800's, many prize work competitions were staged to demonstrate that factory workers could not compete with skilled craftsmen. Some of the fanciest and most refined work ever to be done was created for these exhibitions. Ms. Swann tells of coming across boots made in Philadelphia for show that were stitched 64 stitches to the inch. Now just about the finest work that can be done on leather with a modern sewing machine is approximately 30 stitches to the inch. More stitches only tear the leather. Additionally, we know that this work was done by hand. James Devlin says in his book The Guide To The Trade that this work was done with an awl so fine that upon an accidental piercing of his hand, the wound neither hurt nor bled; and that a human hair was used for a needle. And although those working in the trade--the boot and shoemakers--are fewer each year; those who work the bristle and the awl do so under the scrutiny of the ghosts of past masters.

https://people.seas.harvard.edu/~jones/mckay/history.html

Night

Fascinating stuff.  Great post, didge....and true in historical detail.


Thanks Quill, but this is a topic I know very little about.

Maybe you can help Horatio more on this in regards to West virginia, in the late 19th century on shoe wear and more in regards to what they wore when it snowed.

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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by Original Quill on Thu Jun 22, 2017 6:34 pm

Civil War Military Style Boots, Light Artillery or Cavalry
by Fugawee Footware
Last Updated: Wednesday, 26-Apr-2017



These boots are made by one of the few boot makers in the world that still produces the antique molded front piece. The master boot maker was sent an unworn original model 1859 Boot made in 1865. The top is about 12" tall when measured from the top of the sole and about 14" tall when measured from the floor.

This boot was originally called the M1851 Artillery Driver's Boot, as it was originally only issued to Artillery Drivers. During the American Civil War they were also issued to Cavalry troops and continued as the Cavalry Boot until replaced by the Model 1872 Boot, which is a modified version of this boot.

   This boot is an exact copy, with the exception of two changes. The originals had been machine pegged, nine pegs to the inch. Ours is stitched due to the lack of machine that can duplicate the work of an 1860's pegging machine. And for comfort the boot is lined with calfskin leather from top to toe. The leather in our boot is a semi-rough cowhide especially selected after studying the original boot. They will take a shine after a few polishes or will take Lexol for a "field-worn" look. They have a sewn sole with a ridged shank pegged into place. This boot has a comfortable square toe and a tight-gripping heel. There are no side seam welts.

   This boot covers an amazing time period. It is ideal for many impressions from just after 1800 through 1900 and beyond. It is suitable for 1800's miners, teamsters, cattlemen, farmers, Indian Wars, Cowboy Shooters, etc.. Mail order catalogues printed in the 1890s show a wide assortment of prices and qualities in styles just like these.

   According to Quartermaster records, most shoes and boots purchased had sewn soles. The pegged sole booties were purchased for $1.25 and $1.30 per pair as opposed to the average of about $1.90 for sewn soles, but the sewn soles were preferred.

Stove Pipe Boot / Common Boot 1847-1900



The Stovepipe boot is dated 1847 to 1900. It was first known as a Common Boot. Reaching almost to the knee and wide enough so the trousers could be tucked. We may find that it dates back further but so far that is the best dates I can find. We have had requests for this two piece boot, so we hope it will fill in for the persona you are trying to create.

As you can tell it is almost a straight last, but it is a left/right. That means that the arch in the boot will make it comfortable for walking as for riding. A steel shank will give a long life to this fine boot.

The leg has been widened so you can wear these boots outside of your trousers. The leg height is 17", proportioned to the size. It is lined with calf skin, has pull tabs (not mule ears) on the outside of the top. The toe is a moderate square and the heel is 1 1/4". The top of the boot is about 12" from the ground, depending on the size. The leather is black and smooth but not a high shine. It has a full lining.

This boot should be good for drovers, prospectors and shooters (before the cowboy boots).

Civil War Brogans/Jefferson Bootee, U.S. Contract
U.S. and C.S. as well as Civilian Dress or Work




Civil War Contract bootees are available in smooth top grain or rough flesh-out. The leather is staked until pliable before cutting out the pieces for the uppers. Most Civil War bootees were issued in smooth leather (right) but rough-out (left) seems to have taken over among re-enactors. These Contract Bootee have four lace holes.

According to Quartermaster records, most shoes and boots purchased had sewn soles.

Civil War Brogan/Bootee, Southern/Monticello
C.S. as well as Civilian Work Shoes




The Southern or Monticello model. is also appropriate for Seminole Wars and as a work shoe from the early 1800's until the present day, is built on the same lasts as the Federal Contract Bootee. It has five lace holes and a pull tab on the back of the boot. It's color is russet or natural and the rough-out leather takes on a beautiful color when given a coat of Lexol or other oil. Sewn-On Soles.

   The Monticello was patterned after the shoes shown on a Gettysburg statue of Civil War Confederate soldiers around a mounted Gen. Robert E. Lee. It is reputed that the Confederates had a shoe factory at a Florida town called Monticello. However, there is also a Monticello in Alabama. We find no trace of the Monticello, Florida factory.

   The Monticello or Civil War Southern shoe is the closest thing to a ready-made 1800s work shoe that you will find. Shoes like these were packed 100 pairs to the barrel and shipped from Boston to St Louis and on to Taos, to the Western frontier and any seaport that the Stars and Stripes traded with. This type of shoe was worn by the Yankee seamen who, in the 1820s rounded Cape Horn to load cattle hides in the tiny Spanish port of Los Angeles de California. They took the hides back to Boston, where they were made into shoes and harness.

Congress - Civil War Shoe/Gaiter: Black
Civilian Dress or Work - 1837-1900




This shoe is an all leather shoe with elastic sides and a tab on the back for ease of slipping it on. They come in smooth black and although the first shipment came with a rubber heel, in the future the heels will also be of leather. It was known by several names and originated just after 1837 as part of the Balmoral fashion surge.

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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by Guest on Thu Jun 22, 2017 6:40 pm

Very interesting Quill

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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by HoratioTarr on Thu Jun 22, 2017 10:01 pm

Yes, Quill. Thanks for the info. Still no sign of a true rubber boot though. I guess they didn't exist then. Probably more likely galoshes.
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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by WhoseYourWolfie on Fri Jun 23, 2017 1:44 am

study

The manufacturing processes probably weren't around to see mass-production of rubber boots until after WW1  ???

"Vulcanisation" processes weren't developed until the early--mid 19th century, and would have taken time to be industrialised..

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vulcanization#History

I suspect that in the late 19th and early 20th century their work boots for snowy conditions would still have been heavily-waxed full-thickness leather boots with heavy leather soles, wool lining inside, over two pairs of socks ?
Maybe with waxed canvas (hemp, in those days..) gaiters over the top, for the more fortunate workers ?

(Even today,  leather ski boots are still preferred (over synthetics..) by many cross-country/backcountry snow skiers).

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Re: Question regarding American History

Post by HoratioTarr on Fri Jun 23, 2017 2:21 am

WhoseYourWolfie wrote:study

The manufacturing processes probably weren't around to see mass-production of rubber boots until after WW1  ???

"Vulcanisation" processes weren't developed until the early--mid 19th century, and would have taken time to be industrialised..

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vulcanization#History

I suspect that in the late 19th and early 20th century their work boots for snowy conditions would still have been heavily-waxed full-thickness leather boots with heavy leather soles, wool lining inside, over two pairs of socks ?
Maybe with waxed canvas (hemp, in those days..) gaiters over the top, for the more fortunate workers ?

(Even today,  leather ski boots are still preferred (over synthetics..) by many cross-country/backcountry snow skiers).

Well, thank you Wolfie. Very interesting and very helpful.
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