Parents Should Not Google Their Child’s Symptoms Before Visiting The Doctor, Say Experts

Page 2 of 2 Previous  1, 2

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Parents Should Not Google Their Child’s Symptoms Before Visiting The Doctor, Say Experts

Post by Guest on Wed May 17, 2017 4:21 am

First topic message reminder :

Every parent is guilty of turning to Google to help answer those questions we’re pretty certain we should know the answer to; how many hours on the iPad is too many hours, or what happens if my child puts Sudocrem up their nose?

But now experts are warning that parents should not be using internet search engines to diagnose their children when they fall ill, as it has been shown to reduce trust in trained medical professionals. 



TARA MOORE VIA GETTY IMAGES


The study from the American Academy of Pediatrics showed that online information can not only influence whether parents trust a diagnosis given by their doctor, but can also lead to delays in treatment. Lead author Ruth Milanaik, associate professor, said: “The internet is a powerful information tool, but it is limited by its inability to reason and think.

“Simply entering a collection of symptoms in a search engine may not reflect the actual medical situation at hand. These computer-generated diagnoses may mislead patients or parents and cause them to question their doctors’ medical abilities and seek a second opinion, thereby delaying treatment.” 

Researchers recruited 1,374 parents for the trial, who were presented with a scenario where a child had a rash and a worsening fever, which had been present for the past three days. 

The first group were then presented with screen shots of online diagnosis that described symptoms of Scarlet fever, and Strep throat, a serious disease that if left untreated can lead to rheumatic fever, and heart damage.

A second group were given similar screen shots but detailing symptoms of Kawasaki disease, a condition in which blood vessels become inflamed. Prompt treatment is required to avoid life-threatening complications such as aneurisms.

A third set of parents, received no screen shots at all. 

They were then all told that the doctor had made a diagnosis of scarlet fever, and in the control group, where they had not seen any screen shots, 81% of parents trusted the conclusion that had been reached.
However, only 61.3% of participants who had viewed the Kawasaki disease information, reported trusting the doctor’s conclusion.

And 64.2% of the parents in the second group said they would be seeking a second opinion before they were satisfied with the outcome. 

Milanaik said: “Parents who still have doubts should absolutely seek a second opinion…but they shouldn’t be afraid to discuss the result of internet information with the physician.”




http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/parents-should-not-google-their-childs-symptoms-before-visiting-the-doctor-say-experts_uk_59119d5fe4b0104c73523980





Even the NHS 111 never tries to diagnose and it can take tests to determine what is the illness.

So many parents fall prey to doing this and constantly wrongly assume they know what is wrong with their children and so many times are wrong. It also leads to a confirmation bias when answering questions to the NHS 111, clinicians and GP's. As parents have convinced themselves their child has what they have read online. 

Yes i understand many parents are concerned for their children, but where they have no medical training they can and do cause further complications for their children by wrongly assuming they do know. Doctors do not always get it right, but they are best placed to help and parents are generally not when they self diagnose.

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down


Re: Parents Should Not Google Their Child’s Symptoms Before Visiting The Doctor, Say Experts

Post by Raggamuffin on Wed May 17, 2017 9:03 pm

Thorin wrote:
Raggamuffin wrote:

A second opinion won't change the results of blood tests.

Psoriasis is an autoimmune condition, so how is a dermatologist an expert in it?

All I can say is that I had one diagnosis, and then another, neither of which seemed quite right, although they seemed reasonable at the time. By googling, I found my exact symptoms and could then discuss it with the doctor.


A second opinion can come to a different conclusion over what it could be
You keep stagnated to blood tests based to conditions which can be hard detect ignoring many that do detect the conditions.

As to psoriasis they are expert in skin conditions, as well as understanding the autoimmune system that causes this. Weird question.

So were you referred to any specialists and is the fact you were not portraying your symptoms correctly?

Not being horrible, but half the problems is getting patients to be openly honest about the problems. Some can wrongly lead patients into thinking and agreeing to things unconnected. Again its allowing the patient to be as fully open about the condition and the GP can only go by what information is given to them

Hmmm, I'm not sure I would call psoriasis a skin condition as such. It manifests itself as a skin problem, that's for sure, but it can also affect joints. However, skin psoriasis is fairly distinctive and is visible, whereas other conditions are not, so they're harder to diagnose.

I portrayed my symptoms exactly as they were - several times. Yes, I was eventually referred to a specialist, who pretty much agreed with the first diagnosis, until further tests revealed something else. Even then, the symptoms were not typical, so it took a while to come to the right conclusion.

_________________

"It ain't over 'til it's over"
avatar
Raggamuffin

Posts : 29436
Join date : 2014-02-10

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Parents Should Not Google Their Child’s Symptoms Before Visiting The Doctor, Say Experts

Post by Guest on Wed May 17, 2017 9:14 pm

Raggamuffin wrote:
Thorin wrote:


A second opinion can come to a different conclusion over what it could be
You keep stagnated to blood tests based to conditions which can be hard detect ignoring many that do detect the conditions.

As to psoriasis they are expert in skin conditions, as well as understanding the autoimmune system that causes this. Weird question.

So were you referred to any specialists and is the fact you were not portraying your symptoms correctly?

Not being horrible, but half the problems is getting patients to be openly honest about the problems. Some can wrongly lead patients into thinking and agreeing to things unconnected. Again its allowing the patient to be as fully open about the condition and the GP can only go by what information is given to them

Hmmm, I'm not sure I would call psoriasis a skin condition as such. It manifests itself as a skin problem, that's for sure, but it can also affect joints. However, skin psoriasis is fairly distinctive and is visible, whereas other conditions are not, so they're harder to diagnose.

I portrayed my symptoms exactly as they were - several times. Yes, I was eventually referred to a specialist, who pretty much agreed with the first diagnosis, until further tests revealed something else. Even then, the symptoms were not typical, so it took a while to come to the right conclusion.


Its still a skin condition and they are experts on the condition.

Well in your case it was difficult to detect what is exactly wrong. The point is leading questions can lead to patients agreeing to things that may not actually be the case. So if the symptoms are not typical its clear further avenues had to be looked at. I would have asked to see a second specialist, as in this case it would have been important to do so..

I had to go into A&E on Monday, which is ironic as I work at the hospital as i knew my asthma was progressively getting worse. The triage nurse said I should call my GP, of which I already had and knew my peak flow was down to 80% normal, when I left the house that morning. I was not bad yet but it was slowly getting worse. I had a call from my GP, who said I needed a Nebulizer. The Nurse was reluctant to have me book in, but I can be persistent. I went straight to see another nurse who took my obs, which my oxygen stats were fine but agreed the best course of action was prevention. Others were seen before me and by the time I saw the doctor 2 hours later and had my peak flow tested it was down to 45% and my oxygen stats borderline, just above 90%. They even had trouble getting a needle into my veins to obtain blood samples and have lovely bruises to show for this. That is because of the asthma getting worse. Where others have come back out into the waiting area after seeing the doctor. I was taken straight into ambulatory care, place on a Nebulizer and a saline drip, given a huge does of steroids and told if I did not get my peak flow up past 70% i would have to be admitted. Within half an hour I as near back to normal. My peak flow was at 90% and my other obs were normal. That is how quickly you can deteriorate and return back to normal with asthma and just thankful it did improve.

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: Parents Should Not Google Their Child’s Symptoms Before Visiting The Doctor, Say Experts

Post by Raggamuffin on Wed May 17, 2017 9:22 pm

Thorin wrote:
Raggamuffin wrote:

Hmmm, I'm not sure I would call psoriasis a skin condition as such. It manifests itself as a skin problem, that's for sure, but it can also affect joints. However, skin psoriasis is fairly distinctive and is visible, whereas other conditions are not, so they're harder to diagnose.

I portrayed my symptoms exactly as they were - several times. Yes, I was eventually referred to a specialist, who pretty much agreed with the first diagnosis, until further tests revealed something else. Even then, the symptoms were not typical, so it took a while to come to the right conclusion.


Its still a skin condition and they are experts on the condition.

Well in your case it was difficult to detect what is exactly wrong. The point is leading questions can lead to patients agreeing to things that may not actually be the case. So if the symptoms are not typical its clear further avenues had to be looked at. I would have asked to see a second specialist, as in this case it would have been important to do so..

I had to go into A&E on Monday, which is ironic as I work at the hospital as i knew my asthma was progressively getting worse. The triage nurse said I should call my GP, of which I already had and knew my peak flow was down to 80% normal, when I left the house this morning. I was not bad yet but it was slowly getting worse. I had a call from my GP, who said I needed a Nebulizer. The Nurse was reluctant to have me book in, but I can be persistent. I went straight to see another nurse who took my obs, which my oxygen stats were fine but agreed the best course of action was prevention. Others were seen before me and by the time I saw the doctor 2 hours later and had my peak flow tested it was down to 45% and my oxygen stats borderline, just above 90%. They even had trouble getting a needle into my veins to obtain blood samples and have lovely bruises to show for this. That is because of the asthma getting worse. Where others have come back out into the waiting area after seeing the doctor. I was taken straight into ambulatory care, place on a Nebulizer and a saline drip, given a huge does of steroids and told if I did not get my peak flow up past 70% i would have to be admitted. Within half an hour I as near back to normal. My peak flow was at 90% and my other obs were normal. That is how quickly you can deteriorate and return back to normal with asthma and just thankful it did improve.

In my case, the first diagnosis seemed very reasonable, and I agreed with it based on what I researched, so I'm absolutely not criticising my GP at all. I took medication, and the problem went away, but then it came back whilst I was still on the medication, so that's when I was referred and the diagnosis eventually changed. It took a long time though, and I think that doing my own research definitely helped.

I question whether psoriasis is actually a skin condition because it's more systemic than that. Lupus can also manifest itself as a skin condition, but that's only part of it, and you wouldn't necessarily see a dermatologist for it.

I gather that asthma can be a very variable and unpredictable condition, and there is much research still going on. Glad you're OK now.

_________________

"It ain't over 'til it's over"
avatar
Raggamuffin

Posts : 29436
Join date : 2014-02-10

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Parents Should Not Google Their Child’s Symptoms Before Visiting The Doctor, Say Experts

Post by Guest on Wed May 17, 2017 9:28 pm

Raggamuffin wrote:
Thorin wrote:


Its still a skin condition and they are experts on the condition.

Well in your case it was difficult to detect what is exactly wrong. The point is leading questions can lead to patients agreeing to things that may not actually be the case. So if the symptoms are not typical its clear further avenues had to be looked at. I would have asked to see a second specialist, as in this case it would have been important to do so..

I had to go into A&E on Monday, which is ironic as I work at the hospital as i knew my asthma was progressively getting worse. The triage nurse said I should call my GP, of which I already had and knew my peak flow was down to 80% normal, when I left the house this morning. I was not bad yet but it was slowly getting worse. I had a call from my GP, who said I needed a Nebulizer. The Nurse was reluctant to have me book in, but I can be persistent. I went straight to see another nurse who took my obs, which my oxygen stats were fine but agreed the best course of action was prevention. Others were seen before me and by the time I saw the doctor 2 hours later and had my peak flow tested it was down to 45% and my oxygen stats borderline, just above 90%. They even had trouble getting a needle into my veins to obtain blood samples and have lovely bruises to show for this. That is because of the asthma getting worse. Where others have come back out into the waiting area after seeing the doctor. I was taken straight into ambulatory care, place on a Nebulizer and a saline drip, given a huge does of steroids and told if I did not get my peak flow up past 70% i would have to be admitted. Within half an hour I as near back to normal. My peak flow was at 90% and my other obs were normal. That is how quickly you can deteriorate and return back to normal with asthma and just thankful it did improve.

In my case, the first diagnosis seemed very reasonable, and I agreed with it based on what I researched, so I'm absolutely not criticising my GP at all. I took medication, and the problem went away, but then it came back whilst I was still on the medication, so that's when I was referred and the diagnosis eventually changed. It took a long time though, and I think that doing my own research definitely helped.

I question whether psoriasis is actually a skin condition because it's more systemic than that. Lupus can also manifest itself as a skin condition, but that's only part of it, and you wouldn't necessarily see a dermatologist for it.

I gather that asthma can be a very variable and unpredictable condition, and there is much research still going on. Glad you're OK now.


It does effect the skin and dermatology covers this, even though psoriasis can lead onto psoriasis arthritis, which is very grim I understand. I have no idea how or why they group what conditions are specialized, but its those who specialize in Dermatology who are specialists on the condition.

Not had an attack in ages, so its good to recognize when its going to be problematic, but thanks am much better but still on steroids, which I dont like to be

Is your condition now under control?

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: Parents Should Not Google Their Child’s Symptoms Before Visiting The Doctor, Say Experts

Post by Raggamuffin on Wed May 17, 2017 9:31 pm

Thorin wrote:
Raggamuffin wrote:

In my case, the first diagnosis seemed very reasonable, and I agreed with it based on what I researched, so I'm absolutely not criticising my GP at all. I took medication, and the problem went away, but then it came back whilst I was still on the medication, so that's when I was referred and the diagnosis eventually changed. It took a long time though, and I think that doing my own research definitely helped.

I question whether psoriasis is actually a skin condition because it's more systemic than that. Lupus can also manifest itself as a skin condition, but that's only part of it, and you wouldn't necessarily see a dermatologist for it.

I gather that asthma can be a very variable and unpredictable condition, and there is much research still going on. Glad you're OK now.


It does effect the skin and dermatology covers this, even though psoriasis can lead onto psoriasis arthritis, which is very grim I understand. I have no idea how or why they group what conditions are specialized, but its those who specialize in Dermatology who are specialists on the condition.

Not had an attack in ages, so its good to recognize when its going to be problematic, but thanks am much better but still on steroids, which I dont like to be

Is your condition now under control?

The trouble is that there are many conditions which affect different parts - skin, joints, heart, etc, so people end up seeing loads of different specialists. Laughing

Do dermatologists prescribe things like biologics or DMARDs for psoriasis?

Mine is under control, thank you - well mostly anyway. Razz

_________________

"It ain't over 'til it's over"
avatar
Raggamuffin

Posts : 29436
Join date : 2014-02-10

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Parents Should Not Google Their Child’s Symptoms Before Visiting The Doctor, Say Experts

Post by Guest on Wed May 17, 2017 9:34 pm

Raggamuffin wrote:
Thorin wrote:


It does effect the skin and dermatology covers this, even though psoriasis can lead onto psoriasis arthritis, which is very grim I understand. I have no idea how or why they group what conditions are specialized, but its those who specialize in Dermatology who are specialists on the condition.

Not had an attack in ages, so its good to recognize when its going to be problematic, but thanks am much better but still on steroids, which I dont like to be

Is your condition now under control?

The trouble is that there are many conditions which affect different parts - skin, joints, heart, etc, so people end up seeing loads of different specialists. Laughing

Do dermatologists prescribe things like biologics or DMARDs for psoriasis?

Mine is under control, thank you - well mostly anyway. Razz


I see your point, but I guess they study further into all the complications of this

Yes they do prescribe biologics.

Glad you have it under control Rags

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: Parents Should Not Google Their Child’s Symptoms Before Visiting The Doctor, Say Experts

Post by Raggamuffin on Wed May 17, 2017 9:51 pm


It seems to me that the only way to really control it is to suppress the immune system.

Actually, I think there are still questions around whether it's an autoimmune condition or not. It's most interesting.

_________________

"It ain't over 'til it's over"
avatar
Raggamuffin

Posts : 29436
Join date : 2014-02-10

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Parents Should Not Google Their Child’s Symptoms Before Visiting The Doctor, Say Experts

Post by Guest on Wed May 17, 2017 9:54 pm

Raggamuffin wrote:

It seems to me that the only way to really control it is to suppress the immune system.

Actually, I think there are still questions around whether it's an autoimmune condition or not. It's most interesting.


Indeed there are many questions around this Rags

The thing is I dont have any issues with anything else with immune system, which you think there would be. In fact I rarely get flu, have not thrown up for over two decades. In fact the only time I get ill is with my asthma. So its very strange in many aspects

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: Parents Should Not Google Their Child’s Symptoms Before Visiting The Doctor, Say Experts

Post by Raggamuffin on Wed May 17, 2017 9:59 pm

Thorin wrote:
Raggamuffin wrote:

It seems to me that the only way to really control it is to suppress the immune system.

Actually, I think there are still questions around whether it's an autoimmune condition or not. It's most interesting.


Indeed there are many questions around this Rags

The thing is I dont have any issues with anything else with immune system, which you think there would be. In fact I rarely get flu, have not thrown up for over two decades. In fact the only time I get ill is with my asthma. So its very strange in many aspects

Yes, well one can have a normal immune system as far as fighting off viruses is concerned, but still have an autoimmune disease - whereby the immune system attacks tissues which are supposed to be there. I'm really not sure about psoriasis. I've called it autoimmune, but I think that might be too simplistic.

_________________

"It ain't over 'til it's over"
avatar
Raggamuffin

Posts : 29436
Join date : 2014-02-10

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Parents Should Not Google Their Child’s Symptoms Before Visiting The Doctor, Say Experts

Post by Guest on Wed May 17, 2017 10:02 pm

Raggamuffin wrote:
Thorin wrote:


Indeed there are many questions around this Rags

The thing is I dont have any issues with anything else with immune system, which you think there would be. In fact I rarely get flu, have not thrown up for over two decades. In fact the only time I get ill is with my asthma. So its very strange in many aspects

Yes, well one can have a normal immune system as far as fighting off viruses is concerned, but still have an autoimmune disease - whereby the immune system attacks tissues which are supposed to be there. I'm really not sure about psoriasis. I've called it autoimmune, but I think that might be too simplistic.



Clearly more needs to be done to understand this condition. Me I am fine with some UVB from the sun and it clears up very quick, but it can make it worse for some people with psoriasis. Maybe one day they will get to a better understanding.

Anyway, all the best rags, night.

Guest
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: Parents Should Not Google Their Child’s Symptoms Before Visiting The Doctor, Say Experts

Post by Raggamuffin on Wed May 17, 2017 10:05 pm

What I think is a bit puzzling is that they differentiate between RA and psoriatic arthritis, for example, but what is the real difference? People with one autoimmune condition are more likely to have another, so if psoriasis is autoimmune, perhaps the joint problems are a different autoimmune disease?

_________________

"It ain't over 'til it's over"
avatar
Raggamuffin

Posts : 29436
Join date : 2014-02-10

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Parents Should Not Google Their Child’s Symptoms Before Visiting The Doctor, Say Experts

Post by Raggamuffin on Wed May 17, 2017 10:05 pm

Thorin wrote:
Raggamuffin wrote:

Yes, well one can have a normal immune system as far as fighting off viruses is concerned, but still have an autoimmune disease - whereby the immune system attacks tissues which are supposed to be there. I'm really not sure about psoriasis. I've called it autoimmune, but I think that might be too simplistic.



Clearly more needs to be done to understand this condition. Me I am fine with some UVB from the sun and it clears up very quick, but it can make it worse for some people with psoriasis. Maybe one day they will get to a better understanding.

Anyway, all the best rags, night.

Goodnight. That was a very interesting discussion.

_________________

"It ain't over 'til it's over"
avatar
Raggamuffin

Posts : 29436
Join date : 2014-02-10

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Parents Should Not Google Their Child’s Symptoms Before Visiting The Doctor, Say Experts

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 2 of 2 Previous  1, 2

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum