Wyoming Woman Died From Coming In Contact With Bat - In Her Bedroom

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Wyoming Woman Died From Coming In Contact With Bat - In Her Bedroom

Post by Guest on Mon Jun 06, 2016 3:43 pm

Bats In The Bedroom Can Spread Rabies Without An Obvious Bite

June 2, 2016 1:01 PM ET

An elderly woman died and more than two dozen people were treated for possible rabies exposure after her family failed to realize that a nighttime encounter with a bat put her at risk of rabies.

Last August, the woman awoke in her Wyoming home and felt a bat on her neck. She swatted it away and washed her hands. Her husband captured the bat with gloved hands and released it outside.

The woman didn't seem to have any bite wounds, so the couple didn't call a doctor, according to an account of the incident published Thursday in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR).

More than a month later, after she had been hospitalized for eight days for a mystery illness, her family remembered the bat.

Lab tests quickly showed that her slurred speech, weakness and respiratory failure were not from Guillain-Barre syndrome, as doctors had thought, but from rabies.

This was the first confirmed rabies infection in Wyoming since the state started documenting reportable infectious diseases in 1911.

The woman's husband, another family member and 22 health care workers had to receive post-exposure rabies treatment. Two other people who had contact with the woman also chose to receive the treatment, despite not having exposures that would necessarily require it.

All of this could have been prevented if the family had understood the risk of rabies. But they never got information that could have helped them — even though they had made multiple phone calls to officials over the years to talk about the removal of bats that lived under the eaves of their home.

The woman's husband had even consulted "a county weed and invasive species authority" about the nighttime bat incident just days after it occurred, but was not told about the risk of rabies or referred to a doctor, according to the MMWR report.

Rabies is rare in the United States, with only one to three human cases occurring here each year. But any potential exposure to a bat has to be taken seriously, because bites can be extremely hard to detect and cases of rabies have occurred in the absence of a recognized bat bite.

That's why people are considered to be "exposed" even if they were just sleeping in the same room as a bat. Someone who's drunk or incapacitated, a child, or a mentally challenged person may also need prophylactic treatment if they're found to be in a room with a bat.

Public health officials say that another human rabies death back in 2011 involved similar missed opportunities.

In that case, a South Carolina woman woke up to a bat in her bedroom and shook it out of curtains through an open window. She believed she'd had no direct contact with the bat, and did not seek medical attention.

When she talked with a local service about removing the bats in her home, she was reportedly not given advice about possible rabies risk or referred to public health officials. "Lack of referral to guidance concerning health risks associated with bats living in the home was possibly a missed opportunity to prevent rabies infection," public health officials noted.

The bottom line: Rabies is almost always fatal, unless people get preventive treatment. And rabid bats have been documented in all 49 continental states.

People who encounter bats may call up a diverse array of wildlife and pest experts for advice, and health officials say that advice needs to include accurate information about the risk of rabies, even in the absence of a visible bite wound.

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/06/02/480414566/bats-in-the-bedroom-can-spread-rabies-without-an-obvious-bite

Some of those old Victorian homes may be the best places for bats to find nesting wedges/under eaves/attic air ventilation areas/soffits that have rotted ...I've found a nest in an old dog house - they don't always nest up high.
While bats will eat twice their weight in mosquito's and other bugs...their very bat droppings are full of bacteria and because their mouth is so small a bite might not be noticeable and all it takes is a scratch to transfer a rabies virus to another human/animal.
Why people think that a bat bite would look like something from those Sci-Fy/Horror shows

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Re: Wyoming Woman Died From Coming In Contact With Bat - In Her Bedroom

Post by eddie on Mon Jun 06, 2016 3:50 pm

A friend of mine keeps boasting that she has bats in her attic and I always think "Rather you than me!"

Over here I think they're a protected species so she is quite happy to have them in her house.

I think she's stupid personally.

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Re: Wyoming Woman Died From Coming In Contact With Bat - In Her Bedroom

Post by HoratioTarr on Mon Jun 06, 2016 3:51 pm

4EVER2 wrote:
Bats In The Bedroom Can Spread Rabies Without An Obvious Bite
 
June 2, 2016 1:01 PM ET

An elderly woman died and more than two dozen people were treated for possible rabies exposure after her family failed to realize that a nighttime encounter with a bat put her at risk of rabies.

Last August, the woman awoke in her Wyoming home and felt a bat on her neck. She swatted it away and washed her hands. Her husband captured the bat with gloved hands and released it outside.

The woman didn't seem to have any bite wounds, so the couple didn't call a doctor, according to an account of the incident published Thursday in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR).

More than a month later, after she had been hospitalized for eight days for a mystery illness, her family remembered the bat.

Lab tests quickly showed that her slurred speech, weakness and respiratory failure were not from Guillain-Barre syndrome, as doctors had thought, but from rabies.

This was the first confirmed rabies infection in Wyoming since the state started documenting reportable infectious diseases in 1911.

The woman's husband, another family member and 22 health care workers had to receive post-exposure rabies treatment. Two other people who had contact with the woman also chose to receive the treatment, despite not having exposures that would necessarily require it.

All of this could have been prevented if the family had understood the risk of rabies. But they never got information that could have helped them — even though they had made multiple phone calls to officials over the years to talk about the removal of bats that lived under the eaves of their home.

The woman's husband had even consulted "a county weed and invasive species authority" about the nighttime bat incident just days after it occurred, but was not told about the risk of rabies or referred to a doctor, according to the MMWR report.

Rabies is rare in the United States, with only one to three human cases occurring here each year. But any potential exposure to a bat has to be taken seriously, because bites can be extremely hard to detect and cases of rabies have occurred in the absence of a recognized bat bite.

That's why people are considered to be "exposed" even if they were just sleeping in the same room as a bat. Someone who's drunk or incapacitated, a child, or a mentally challenged person may also need prophylactic treatment if they're found to be in a room with a bat.

Public health officials say that another human rabies death back in 2011 involved similar missed opportunities.

In that case, a South Carolina woman woke up to a bat in her bedroom and shook it out of curtains through an open window. She believed she'd had no direct contact with the bat, and did not seek medical attention.

When she talked with a local service about removing the bats in her home, she was reportedly not given advice about possible rabies risk or referred to public health officials. "Lack of referral to guidance concerning health risks associated with bats living in the home was possibly a missed opportunity to prevent rabies infection," public health officials noted.

The bottom line: Rabies is almost always fatal, unless people get preventive treatment. And rabid bats have been documented in all 49 continental states.

People who encounter bats may call up a diverse array of wildlife and pest experts for advice, and health officials say that advice needs to include accurate information about the risk of rabies, even in the absence of a visible bite wound.

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/06/02/480414566/bats-in-the-bedroom-can-spread-rabies-without-an-obvious-bite

Some of those old Victorian homes may be the best places for bats to find nesting wedges/under eaves/attic air ventilation areas/soffits that have rotted ...I've found a nest in an old dog house - they don't always nest up high.
While bats will eat twice their weight in mosquito's and other bugs...their very bat droppings are full of bacteria and because their mouth is so small a bite might not be noticeable and all it takes is a scratch to transfer a rabies virus to another human/animal.
Why people think that a bat bite would look like something from those Sci-Fy/Horror shows

Bats are protected in the UK so if a house has them, we can't destroy them or move them on.
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Re: Wyoming Woman Died From Coming In Contact With Bat - In Her Bedroom

Post by Guest on Mon Jun 06, 2016 10:11 pm

Protected, hmmmm?  
Well, I'd be replacing all of my interior doors with screen type doors; I'd be able to have air movement/ventilation but could be assured of safety during the night time hours and  I could isolate those pesky house invaders much easier that way. 

I'm not anti  by any means but I do not want them in my home with me

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Re: Wyoming Woman Died From Coming In Contact With Bat - In Her Bedroom

Post by Lord Foul on Mon Jun 06, 2016 10:15 pm

of course theres nothing stopping you from putting those ultrasonic "rodent scarers" up in your loft......just to keep the mice and rats at bay you understand......OOOO...I DIDNT know bats were affected ossifer.......It never said so on the box.........

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Re: Wyoming Woman Died From Coming In Contact With Bat - In Her Bedroom

Post by eddie on Mon Jun 06, 2016 11:42 pm

Lord Foul wrote:of course theres nothing stopping you from putting those ultrasonic "rodent scarers" up in your loft......just to keep the mice and rats at bay you understand......OOOO...I DIDNT know bats were affected ossifer.......It never said so on the box.........


My defence would be that I didn't know that bats, didn't like cricket bats. Cool

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Re: Wyoming Woman Died From Coming In Contact With Bat - In Her Bedroom

Post by WhoseYourWolfie on Tue Jun 07, 2016 5:12 am

pirat

I WOULDN'T WANT any animals living in roof and wall caveties in homes, hospitals, office buildings  where it could easily be avoided...     (Many people may happily allow/tolerate some kinds of wildlife to inhabit some factory, farm and outbuildings; but at the same time that still doesn't mean that one allows them too near/within  residences, or food preparation and storage areas..).

BATS and most birds seem much more happy residing up in those nice leafy trees anyway, when they have the choice..

Not only are rodents and bats undesirable lodgers within one's homes; but also birds, possums, honeybees, termites, wasps, etc. can cause more problems.
Even setting aside the possible disease risks, then there's the damage done by urine, faeces, and rodents chewing through things --  especially electrical wiring.  Rats chewing through the plastic insulaton on wiring is one of the leading causes of electrical fires worldwide..      bom  


AS FOR Rabies in the USA :  the disease is considered 'endemic' in many regions in the mid-West and West coast, where it may be effectively 'dormant' for years as far as humans are aware, but is always present in clusters of wildlife (e.g. coyotes, bats, racoons, rats..) -- with many unaware of its existence locally until an incident like that in the OP..

And, as many animals are nomadic and migratory by nature, there's no reason why cases won't occasionally show up hundreds of miles from source.       silent

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